NEWS
Rider Alert makes its National Debut at Sturgis

Program, Originated in UK, Could Make a Difference Between Life and Death

Sturgis, SD (August 5, 2011) – Rider Alert, the motorcycle safety program originated in the UK and imported to the USA via the Richmond Ambulance Authority, Bon Secours Hospitals, Virginia and Motorcycle Virginia inc Richmond, makes its national debut this week at the 71st Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.  Teaming up with Geico allows a further national profile for the program to be developed. 

Thomas Garner, GEICO National Motorcycle Director said “Geico is proud to announce it’s partnership with the Rider Alert program and to be a part of the national debut launch for Motorcyclists everywhere.  What better place to educate riders about Rider Alert than the Sturgis Rally.  Come to the GEICO booth located at the Buffalo Chip or on Main Street to obtain free giveaway’s and more information about this tremendous safety program!”

The program provides free identification data cards that will help first responders provide rapid and accurate medical assistance to riders involved in accidents.

“The program, launched in the US just 14 weeks ago has been a phenomenal success,” said Rob Lawrence, chief operating officer of Richmond Ambulance Authority and lead for the Rider Alert Program. “This card is born out of experience – it has been designed by paramedics who have been on both sides of an accident as the injured rider or as medical help. Accessing this basic information after a motorcycle accident can sometimes be impossible. This small tool could mean the difference between life and death.”

The Rider Alert card (www.RiderAlert.org), is placed inside a rider’s helmets and contains vital, life-saving information, emergency contact, and any important medical history. When first responders arrive on the scene of a motorcycle accident, a one-inch, sticker on the outside of the helmet will indicate that the biker has the Rider Alert Card. The sticker also warns untrained responders not to remove the helmet, which could prevent further injury.

Lawrence added “One of the key principles of the program is that it is free to the rider and all funding from the program comes from generous sponsorship.  This is how we have been able to place over 100,000 cards with riders in both Virginia and New York.  To be able to team up with Geico and deliver this card and the idea of safety to riders from around the country at Sturgis is superb; and we hope this will lead to yet further expansion of this simple yet brilliant idea.”

Rider Alert is based on a program called CRASH Card, which was developed in the United Kingdom two years ago by the Ambulance Motorcycle Club. Since its creation, more than 325,000 CRASH Cards have been distributed to riders in Europe. Imported by a collaboration of the Richmond Ambulance Authority, Bon Secours Hospitals, Virginia and Motorcycle Virginia inc, Rider Alert has been welcomed by both Public Safety Agencies and Riders alike.

Rider Alert and Geico encourages all motorcycle riders to get their own Rider Alert Card, fill it out and put it under the lining of their helmet. Then, peel off the one-inch sticker and secure it to the right side of their helmet or helmet visor. Each card is produced in a special waterproof paper that can be written on with a ballpoint pen, and should be able to withstand the environment inside a rider’s helmet.